Wisconsin Genealogy

Borough of Prairie du Chien Wisconsin

The proclamation creating this town was in the following words: “Whereas, It is provided by the ordinance of Congress, for the government of the territory northwest of the river Ohio, which ordinance by several subsequent acts of Congress, has been applied to and now constitutes the fundamental law of said Territory of Michigan, that the governor thereof shall proceed from time to time, as circumstances may require, to lay out the parts of said Territory, in which the Indian title shall have been extinguished, into counties and townships; and, whereas it is deemed primitive of the public good at this …

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Cemeteries, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

There are, at this date (1884), four burying grounds used by the people of Prairie du Chien. These “silent cities” have buried, within their numerous vaults, a history, which nothing but eternity can reveal. Within these sacred enclosures lie buried the joys and sorrows of two generations of pioneers. Here rest the remains of many a bold adventurer and frontiersman, and by his side has long since decayed the mortal part of scores of gallant soldiers. Here the pioneer has of times bent over the coffined form of a darling child, who lived but to lisp, perhaps a single word, …

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Churches of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

Roman Catholics The earliest religious services of which there is any record was that held by the Roman Catholics in 1817, when Father Durand came and held mass, and baptized about 125 persons, all of the families of the French and mixed races. As some children of Catholic parents were found who, although nearly grown men and women, had never before had an opportunity to receive the rites of baptism, it is inferred from this that no priest had visited the post for many years prior to the advent of Father Durand. This Father left a written record behind him, …

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Commercial Interests of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

The commercial interests leading to the foundation, and subsequent development of a city, which must of necessity, receive the attention of the historian, is attended with many difficulties and uncertainties unknown to those who have never undertaken the collection of such matter. Especially is this true of a city dating back to so early a time as Prairie du Chien. Few of the early business men of the place are now living, and to the memory of the few surviving ones, years that have passed but as fleeting hours, and the reports given by these pioneers are often at antipodes …

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First Settlement, Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin

The first settlement in what is now (1884) known as the town of Prairie du Chien was made at what is called Frenchtown, a suburb of the city of Prairie du Chien, and which is located on the “Prairie” midway between the bluff and the east bank of the Mississippi river two miles north of the city. This settlement dates back nearly a century, and was first called “Popple.” The name “Frenchtown” began to be used about 1850. Dennis Courtois was the first white man who settled at this place. In 1820 he made affidavits showing himself to have been …

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First Town Officers, Borough Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin

The following is a list of the first town officers of the town of Prairie du Chien: Alfred Brunson, chairman; Joseph Atherton, Aaron Hazen, supervisors; Theodore Bugbee, town clerk; Isaac P. Perrit Gentil, town assessor; Alfred Brunson, town superintendent of schools; Anson B. Cay, Daniel H. Whaley, William E. Keith, constables; Wiram Knowlton, James H. Lockwood, Joseph Atherton, and Aaron Hazen, justices of the peace. The first annual meeting was held April 3, 1872, when the following officers were elected: John Folsom, Thomas McGrath and Flavien Cherrier, supervisors; M. E. Norris, clerk; Andrew Bosch, assessor; Joseph Pinz, treasurer; M. I. …

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Incorporation of Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin

In 1822 it was enacted by the governor and judges of the territory of Michigan “that all the citizens of this territory, inhabitants of the borough of Prairie du Chien be, and the same are hereby ordained, constituted and declared to be from time to time forever hereafter, one body, corporate and politic, in fact and in name, by the name of the wardens, burgesses and freemen of the borough of Prairie du Chien.” Some of the provisions of the law were very curious; among other things a fine of $2 was assessed for allowing a chimney to blaze out …

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Prairie Du Chien Wisconsin

After the county of Crawford had been created it was clearly seen that the people resident therein needed a town organization; so the secretary of the Territory of Michigan, William Woodbridge, then vested with the power and authority of governor, issued a proclamation forming a “township” (town), which was named the Borough of Prairie Des Chiens.. Read more… Additional Resources for Borough of Prairie Du Chien Schools Flouring Mill Town of Prairie Du Chien Incorporation and Town Officers City Post Office Railroads and Boat Landing The Pile Pontoon Railway Bridge Public Schools District No. 1 District No. 2 Roman Catholic …

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Mills and Manufactories, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

The first milling done at or near the city of Prairie du Chien, was the grinding of small grain, such as wheat, peas, barley and oats. Two or three farmers would unite in the construction of a horsepower mill. The buhrs were large stones cut from the granite rock, found about the city. The product of these mills was sifted by hand. The first regular grist-mill within the limits of the city of Prairie du Chien, was erected by Edward Pelton in 1847. This was a frame structure, except the engine room, which was built of brick. It was situated …

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Societies and Lodges of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

The following societies are now (1884) represented in Prairie du Chien: Good Templars, St. Joseph Benevolent Society, Odd Fellows, Grand Army of the Republic, Ancient Order of United Workmen, Masonic and German Harugari. Prairie du Chien Lodge No. 16 Prairie du Chien Lodge No. 16 (Independent Order of Good Templars), was instituted by S. E. Farnham, special deputy G. M., Oct. 31, 1875, with a charter membership of sixty-six, of whom only two are, at this writing, members in good standing. The first officers were: Dr. John Conant, W. C. T.,; Mrs. J. Lovewell, W. V. T.; Rev. C. F. …

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